MOVarazzi

Thursday, March 7, 2013

913. Oh, Snow!

I live in Crazy Town, a place not known for its winters.  Heck, we’re not even know for our falls or springs.  When people think of Crazy Town, weather is not really part of the equation.  Let’s go visit Crazy Town! they say.  I hear they have outstanding museums and other, uh, cultural stuff!

So it should come as no surprise that snow is, indeed, a surprise. 
The media jumps aboard with its ridiculous 24-hour, up-to-the-minute, don’t-you-dare-miss-it, coverage.  Storm Watch 2013!  the TV headline blares.  Worst Snow in Decades! the local weather girl announces. 

Schools are immediately closed, because we might get (brace yourself) 3 inches of snow!  But we don’t.  Or if we do, it melts within hours. 
No one goes out.  Stores are closed.  Flights are cancelled.  The government is shut down.  And yet, I look out my window as I type this and it looks like this: 



Not so bad.  Livable, even. 
I am sure the people in Canada or Alaska or any of those other places with more polar bears than people just shake their heads at us.  Oh, those Crazy Town natives!  Afraid of a few little white puffs of fluffy snow!  Meanwhile, they get up five minutes early, get the shovel out of the front closet, and go remove eight feet of snow that accumulated overnight on their driveway.  Now they can go to work, just like they do every day.  Snow is not a nuisance or an inconvenience or something to be afraid of.  It just is.  Like air or Starbucks or bad reality TV.  They simply accept the snow and go about their day. 

I wonder if they ever get a “Snow Day” off from school.  Nah, says my friend who grew up in Maine, we call in sick when it’s sunny. 
MOV
("Meteorologist On Vacation")

18 comments:

  1. Hey! You can't go giving the letters their own extrapolation yourself! That's what I do! And yes, only in Crazy Town is a dusting of snow worthy of panic. Otherwise it's known as a garnishment.

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    1. oooh, garnishment. I like that. It sounds French and expensive.

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  2. Or, as my friend in NoVa calls it, 'snoquester.'

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  3. It's the exact same here in Portland, OR. There have even been a couple of times that schools have been cancelled or delayed for the next day because we might be getting snow. Which we ended up not getting. It's ridiculous.

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    1. ok, now that I know you are from Portland, I don't want to even talk about snow or threat of snow or any kind of weather item. Let's talk about the best book store in the whole world and how it is right in your backyard-- Powell's City of Books. Mmmmmmmm. Next, let's talk about the hilarious TV show that I love more than life iteself, Portlandia. Mmmmmmmmmmm. You are so lucky!

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  4. As a Midwesterner I can say that we rarely have snow days. The snow plows start early, as do the salt trucks. The only time we might have a snow day is if we have ice, not snow, or so much snow that the school buses can't run their rural routes. It has to be BAD for us to have a day off.

    I hope you can enjoy your snow. It certainly looks very picturesque. Perhaps the boys would like to do some sledding? Or at our house we like to make snow forts followed by coloring the snow with water laced with food coloring. (Just put the mixture in an old spray bottle.)

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    1. knowing my sons, they would choose red food coloring which would end up looking like fresh blood on the snow. Maybe we will stay in and watch tv instead........

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  5. The Hurricane got her master's degree at Cambridge University and was absolutely shocked when they had the tiniest bit of snow (that melted before noon) and everything shut down. They even closed the post office. She says the British simply can't deal with even a hint of snow.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. ha! but I love all things British. I am secretly British. Or from Oregon.

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  6. In the UK everything grinds to a halt if there's even a hint of fluff settling on the ground. It's kinda awesome to have snow days, but we're probably the laughing stock of, well, anywhere except Australia.

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    1. at least the Australians can identify with you? congrats on your book by the way!!!

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  7. We have only had one snow day s far this year, in part because some of the bigsnow came during december break (and in part because our superintendant made a couple of mistakes) We get cold days here too...meaning no school if the temp or windchill is under -20...brrrrr!

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    1. brrrrrrrr! time for that vacay in Hawaii!

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  8. LOL; lived in Montana for 8 years; they never had snow days. Lived in Santa Fe where the hint of snow would close the schools or delay it for a few hours.

    pretty scene from your neck of the woods; almost makes me miss the snow :)

    betty

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    1. betty-- I know! those Montana people probably think we are insane.

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  9. I live in SW British Columbia, Canada. We did not even have a drop of snow this winter. But I'm not going to mention the rain.

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    1. Are you sure you are really from Canada? I thought your national animal was, uh, snow.

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